Sylvester dermatologist uses HPV vaccine to treat patient with squamous cell tumors

first_imgJul 3 2018Squamous cell carcinoma is the second-most-common form of skin cancer. Evidence suggests the human papilloma virus plays a role in the development of some types of this skin cancer.Two years ago, a 97-year-old woman whose right leg was covered with squamous cell tumors went to see dermatologist Anna Nichols, M.D., Ph.D., at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center. Surgery is the standard of care for most patients with skin cancer.”She was not a candidate for surgery because of the sheer number and size of her tumors. She wasn’t a candidate for radiotherapy, again for the same reasons,” said Dr. Nichols, an assistant professor at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, whose report on this case was published online July 3 in JAMA Dermatology.Related StoriesNanotechnology-based compound used to deliver hepatitis B vaccineLiving with advanced breast cancerScripps CHAVD wins $129 million NIH grant to advance new HIV vaccine approachIn 2017, a case report by Dr. Nichols showed the HPV vaccine Gardasil reduced the number of new basal and squamous cell skin cancers in two patients. Tim Ioannides, M.D., a voluntary faculty member at UM, suggested using the vaccine as an off-label treatment by directly injecting it into the tumors.Since her patient had no other options, Dr. Nichols offered her the treatment. It is considered an “off-label” use because Gardasil is only approved for the prevention of cervical, anal, vulvar and vaginal cancers caused by the human papilloma virus.”I think we had a really reasonable expectation and good data that this was actually going to, at the very least, do no harm to this patient, and possibly provide some benefit,” said Dr. Ioannides. “To have this type of result in such an advanced patient I think was beyond all our expectations.”The patient was first given two doses of the 9-valent HPV vaccine in her arm, six weeks apart. A few weeks later Dr. Nichols directly injected several but not all of the patient’s tumors. The direct intratumoral injections were given four times over 11 months.”All of her tumors completely resolved 11 months after the first direct tumor injection, and she has had no recurrence,” Dr. Nichols said. “It has been about 24 months now since we started with the treatment.””They decided to try it and it worked. It killed them all off,” said the patient, who is now looking forward to celebrating her 100th birthday this fall. Source:http://med.miami.edu/news/sylvesters-use-of-hpv-vaccine-to-treat-patient-with-skin-tumors-reported-inlast_img read more

Cornell University researchers achieve worlds highest resolution images using ptychography

first_imgA ptychographic image of two sheets of molybdenum disulfide, with one rotated by 6.8 degrees with respect to the other. The distances between individual atoms range from a full atomic bond length down to complete overlap. Image courtesy of Prof. David Muller. Jul 25 2018Researchers at Cornell University have used ptychography to achieve the highest resolution ever produced in an electron microscope. The team, led by David Muller, Professor of Applied and Engineering Physics, recently reported their findings in the July 19th issue of Nature, outlining their ability to resolve images to a resolution of 0.39 Å. This level of resolution has enabled them to visualize individual atoms with greater contrast, and less damage than was previously possible. To put their achievement into perspective, it represents a 2.5x improvement over the conventional imaging performance of their microscope. Related StoriesPhasefocus’ Livecyte™ for label-free live cell imaging now available in US and CanadaPhasefocus to launch new cell imaging system with smart incubation technologyPhasefocus invited to present a two day workshop on label-free cell imaging at CATIMPtychography is a computational imaging technique that utilizes sophisticated algorithms to reconstruct an image from overlapping diffraction patterns, created when an object is illuminated. In their paper, Muller’s group use a powerful new electron camera, which they have developed, to record the diffraction patterns with exceptional sensitivity, speed and dynamic range. The world-record resolution was made possible by the combination of detector and ptychography, heralding a new era in electron microscopy.Phasefocus™ has commercialized ptychography as its proprietary platform technology, creating a portfolio of products to accommodate a wide range of imaging applications, encompassing life science, healthcare, engineering, metrology and more.The Phasefocus πbox reconstruction engine, suitable for electron microscopy, is a back-end processing platform that can be connected to a microscope, network or cloud based, to deliver reconstructed ptychographic images to the user’s own software.Compatible with electrons and any electromagnetic wave, πbox deciphers raw diffraction patterns to streamline image generation, making it applicable across a wide range of imaging modalities including X-ray, Electron microscopy and optical microscopy.center_img Source:https://news.cornell.edu/last_img read more

Researchers use 3D printer to create microfluidic probe for studying cancer cells

first_imgAug 9 2018NYU Abu Dhabi Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering Mohammad Qasaimeh, and NYU Abu Dhabi Global PhD Fellow in Engineering and first author of the research Ayoola T. Brimmo, along with other researchers, used a 3D printer to create a functional, integrated, and inexpensive microfluidic probe (MFP) to study cancer cells and other living organisms in a Petri dish. Their research, recently published in journal Scientific Reports, suggests that 3D printers can provide a sophisticated, less expensive MFP, which works just as effectively.Typically made of glass or silicon, MFPs are very tiny scientific tools — roughly the size of a pen tip — and were invented about a decade ago and are continuously being developed and refined. They are used by scientists around the world to study, process, and manipulate live cell cultures in a controlled environment.Related StoriesOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerWhile the technology is well established, it still poses unique challenges and limitations. MFPs cannot be easily produced on demand due to their complex fabrication procedures, and are expensive to make in large quantities because of their assembly procedures.”3D printers provide a simple, rapid, and low-cost technique for fabricating MFPs,” said Qasaimeh, whose team developed a framework to print MFPs and quadrupoles in 3D.”It’s cheaper to produce, easy to scale up, and fast to fabricate — all steps, from design to product, can be made in less than a day,” he explained, and as a result, “any science lab with a moderate resolution stereolithography printer will be able to fabricate 3D MFPs on demand and use them to process cells reliably.”3D printed MFPs, “can deliver reagents in a localized manner, only a few tens of cells can be targeted within the culture dish, while leaving other millions of cultured cells untouched,” added Brimmo.In an earlier study, Qasaimeh and his research team used a silicon MFP to discover how neutrophils respond to moving sources of concentration gradients that mimic infections and pathogens. The research analyzed how quickly these cells respond to stimulation, showed how neutrophils start their migrations at a maximal speed that slows over time, and how neutrophils undergo rolling-like behaviors before they start to pursue an infection site.Qasaimeh is the principal investigator of the Advanced Microfluidics and Microdevices Laboratory at NYU Abu Dhabi, whose work focuses primarily on developing micro-tools for biologists working in human health research, including devices to capture circulating tumor cells taken from blood samples of cancer patients. Source:https://rubenstein.com/last_img read more

All MSP participants with invasive breast cancer can undergo more sparing surgical

first_img Source:https://www.aerzteblatt.de/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 31 2018Participants in the German mammography screening program (MSP) who have invasive breast cancer—including interval cancers—can on the whole undergo more sparing surgical treatment compared with non-participants. This is demonstrated by a study in the current issue of the Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2018; 115: 520-7). The tumor characteristics and prognostic markers of breast cancers detected in MSP participants at screening, in the interval following negative screening, as well as in non-participants were compared.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskResearchers use AI to develop early gastric cancer endoscopic diagnosis systemBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerData on 1531 newly diagnosed cases of invasive and in situ breast cancer (DCIS, ductal carcinoma in situ) were evaluated in two certified breast care centers in Münster, Germany. Comprehensive information on tumor characteristics, tumor biology, and primary surgical treatment was available for all cases. In their retrospective observational study, Bettina Braun and co-authors conclude that breast cancer was still at an early stage (DCIS) more frequently in screening participants compared with non-participants (23% versus 31%). Invasive cancers were smaller in participants (74% versus 55% in the T1 stage), could be operated on more frequently in a breast-conserving manner (75% versus 62%), and a guideline-based indication for adjuvant chemotherapy was less common in these patients (46% versus 52%). The authors emphasize that one can assume comparable figures in other screening regions.last_img read more

Inflammation plays crucial role in preventing heart attacks and strokes study reveals

first_imgThe work also raises an important caution about a high-profile drug, canakinumab, being tested to treat advanced atherosclerosis. The drug would need to be prescribed only to a select group of patients, UVA’s research suggests.Inflammation and AtherosclerosisIn medicine, inflammation is often viewed as harmful, something best suppressed with drugs. Healthcare company Novartis, for example, has recently tested a potent anti-inflammatory drug, canakinumab, in hopes of benefiting patients with advanced atherosclerosis who have previously suffered a heart attack.The new study from the laboratory of UVA’s Gary Owens, PhD, reveals, however, that inflammation plays a key role in maintaining the stability and strength of atherosclerotic lesions inside the blood vessels. Blocking too much of a key inflammatory mediator resulted in to weaker lesions more likely to rupture, because the absence of inflammation leads the body to conclude, wrongly, that the repair has been completed. “We believe that globally suppressing inflammation gives the tissue a false sense of inflammation resolution,” said Ricky Baylis, an MD/PhD student in the Owens lab and major contributor to the study. “And by removing this key danger signal, you appear to be taking away the good guys prematurely.”That means that doctors would need to be highly selective in prescribing canakinumab for atherosclerosis, should it be approved for that purpose by the federal Food and Drug Administration, said Owens, director of UVA’s Robert M. Berne Cardiovascular Research Center.“What our data suggests is that you need to be extremely cautious in starting to give this drug more broadly to lower-risk patients,” he said. “This is not a drug that should be prescribed broadly like statins, because we believe our data suggests that if you suppress inflammatory response without first removing or reducing the cause of the inflammation, which is lipids, necrotic tissue debris and other plaque components, that this could become dangerous and have unintended consequences. … If you give it to the wrong person, it could do the opposite of what you intended.”Related StoriesWeightlifting is better for the heart than cardioRNA-binding protein SRSF3 appears to be key factor for proper heart contraction, survivalNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerThat’s an important caveat because many doctors are eager for a drug to help patients with advanced atherosclerosis who are at high risk. Novartis’ drug testing, for example, seeks to benefit “a group of patients that, despite our best therapies, still have an elevated risk for major cardiovascular events,” Owens said. “There is really no drug for them to take.”Creating Safer DrugsOwens has an ongoing partnership with Novartis, and he noted that the collaboration of companies such as Novartis with scientists at academic universities helps make for safer, more effective medicines.“I hope people will look at the CANTOS clinical trial and our study and find encouragement in the fact that there are scientists in the lab working day and night for years trying to better understand the effects of this intervention strategy,” Owens said. “Our mouse studies allow us to generate hypotheses that can then be tested in humans, to gain a better understanding of what happens when we give these types of drugs. And it’s likely that with that knowledge we’ll be able to better design drugs that are more effective and safer by targeting the bad parts of inflammation but retaining or enhancing the good parts of inflammation that increase the stability of atherosclerotic lesions.”Rapidly Changing Lesions Suggests Both Promise and PerilIn addition to a more nuanced understanding of inflammation in atherosclerosis, the study suggests that our lesions are more susceptible to change – both for better or for worse. The traditional view of atherosclerotic lesions is that they’re dormant – that they remain largely unchanged after the body creates them to seal off accumulations of dangerous material inside the blood vessels. In that sense, the fibrous caps covering the lesions have been viewed like patches on a tire. But UVA’s study finds that the caps change significantly over time and can change quite quickly. This became apparent when treatment with the anti-inflammatory therapy rapidly reduced fibrous cap integrity. The finding suggests that doctors and patients have a much greater opportunity to strengthen the caps to prevent heart attacks and strokes.“This study seems to indicate that the fibrous cap, as a structure, is actually much more plastic than previously thought,” Baylis said. “This can be seen as an obstacle but also an opportunity, suggesting that proper treatment and lifestyle changes can rapidly stabilize risky lesions but also that poor management – even for short periods – may have the opposite effect.” Researchers Gary Owens (left) and Ricky Baylis and colleagues have found a positive role for inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions inside the blood vessels. Sep 20 2018Inflammation, long considered a dangerous contributor to atherosclerosis, actually plays an important role in preventing heart attacks and strokes, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine reveals.center_img Source:https://newsroom.uvahealth.com/2018/09/19/inflammation-heart-attacks-strokes/last_img read more

Monkeys face says Dont mate with me

For the monkeys in the Guenon genus, breeding with another guenon species can lead to trouble. The offspring of these unions tend to be infertile, and thus a dead end from an evolutionary standpoint. If many monkeys from a single population interbreed, it could cause a sharp decline in the population. The problem is that many guenon species live in close proximity to each other, heightening the risk for interbreeding. As a result, species that live in close contact have evolved certain facial patterns to prevent any unwanted hookups, researchers report today in Nature Communications. The scientists snapped photographs of 2 dozen species of guenons (pictured) for 18 months and used face recognition algorithms to determine key features that demonstrated stark differences between neighboring species—white fur patches that cover the nose, a well-defined unibrow, or colorful ear tufts, just to name a few. The findings put to bed an alternative hypothesis that suggested environmental factors such as the lighting of a species’s habitat could be the cause of guenon facial diversity. read more

Birds bobcats and even humans may be evolving because they live in

first_img House finches in Tucson, Arizona, have evolved longer, wider beaks to scarf down the sunflower seeds that pack backyard birdfeeders, and holy hawksbeard plants in Montpellier, France, make more seeds to cope with the city’s poor soil. Those are just a couple of the dramatic examples of urban evolution—which has affected everything from bedbugs to bobcats—researchers document in a review paper published today in Science. Roads and buildings prevent animals from moving from place to place, creating small, isolated populations that begin to differentiate—both physically and genetically—from each other, sparking evolutionary changes. But such barriers can also reduce the genetic diversity of a species, making it less resilient to threats such as climate change and disease. Even humans may be evolving. One study compiled by the review reveals that people in older cities are more resistant on a genetic level to such diseases as leprosy and tuberculosis, possibly because they descended from individuals who were better able to cope with these dangers. Birds, bobcats, and even humans may be evolving because they live in cities By Roni DenglerNov. 2, 2017 , 2:00 PMlast_img read more

Top stories Floridas HIV problem ancient skull surgery and corrections to a

first_imgCranial surgery without modern anesthesia and antibiotics may sound like a death sentence. But trepanation—the act of drilling, cutting, or scraping a hole in the skull for medical reasons—was practiced for thousands of years from ancient Greece to pre-Columbian Peru. Not every patient survived. But many did, including more than 100 subjects of the Inca Empire. A new study of their skulls and hundreds of others from pre-Columbian Peru suggests the success rates of premodern surgeons there was shockingly high: up to 80% during the Inca era, compared with just 50% during the American Civil War some 400 years later.Following charges of flawed statistics, major medical journal sets the record straightOne year after a damning review suggested that many published clinical trials contain statistical errors, The New England Journal of Medicine is correcting five of the papers fingered and retracting and republishing a sixth, about whether a Mediterranean diet helps prevent heart disease. (Spoiler alert: It still does, according to the new version of the paper.) Despite errors missed until now, in many ways the system worked as intended, with the journal launching an inquiry within days of the accusations.Sexual harassment isn’t just about sex: Groundbreaking report details persistent hostility female scientists faceAsk someone for an example of sexual harassment and they might cite a professor’s insistent requests to a grad student for sex. But such lurid incidents account for only a small portion of a serious and widespread harassment problem in science, according to a report released this week by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. Two years in the making, the report describes pervasive and damaging “gender harassment”—behaviors that belittle women and make them feel they don’t belong, including sexist comments and demeaning jokes. Between 17% and 50% of female science and medical students reported this kind of harassment in large surveys conducted by two major university systems across 36 campuses.Artificial intelligence can predict how you’ll look decades from nowPolice searching for a long-lost person or fugitive sometimes have little more to go on than an old photograph. Artists or computer programs can attempt to predict what these individuals look like today, but both approaches have flaws. Now, scientists have harnessed advanced artificial intelligence to render artificial aging that’s more realistic (and depressing) than ever. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Katie LanginJun. 15, 2018 , 4:05 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe ‘We’re in a mess.’ Why Florida is struggling with an unusually severe HIV/AIDS problemIn 2016, Miami, Florida, was first on the list of new HIV diagnoses in U.S. cities. Florida also has more cases of AIDS than any other state. The problem is complex, but it differs significantly in urban and rural regions. Miami, for example, is a diverse community full of immigrants who cannot be reached with a one-size-fits-all message. Rural Florida is in the conservative Bible Belt in the deep South, which can be homophobic and looks askance at sexual education. Now, new efforts are underway to try to solve Florida’s AIDS crisis by squarely looking at these shortcomings and confronting them—one by one.South America’s Inca civilization was better at skull surgery than Civil War doctors Top stories: Florida’s HIV problem, ancient skull surgery, and corrections to a flawed diet study Email (Left to right): MISHA FRIEDMAN; D. KUSHNER ET AL., WORLD NEUROSURGERY 114, 245 (2018); JOZEF POLC/500PX last_img read more

At many river deltas scientists are missing a major source of sea

first_imgA surface elevation table is used to measure subsidence in a tropical swamp in Indonesia. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Satellites are the main tools for monitoring the absolute changes in ocean height, which reflect the biggest drivers of sea level rise: melting ice and the expansion of warming water. But for people and ecosystems, the relative impact of rising or falling land is just as important. Some regions are still rebounding thousands of years after ancient ice sheets melted, lifting a colossal weight off Earth’s elastic mantle. Many more are subsiding. “It’s something we’ve been overlooking too long in sea level projections,” says Aimée Slangen, a climate scientist at the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Yerseke and a lead author of the sea level chapter of the next United Nations climate report.Louisiana, for example, is sinking fast. Although compaction is the primary culprit, the extraction of groundwater, oil, and gas also play a role. Sediment washed down the Mississippi River once compensated for the subsidence, but levees and other engineered structures now shunt it out into the Gulf of Mexico. To monitor the sediment loss, the state over the past few decades has deployed a network of some 400 simple wetland-monitoring instruments, called surface elevation tables.The table, a metal arm that juts out parallel to the swamp’s surface, is anchored to a pole driven deep below. Twice a year, a series of pins are lowered from the table until they just touch the marsh surface—giving a regular measure of how fast the surface is sinking relative to deeper layers. Five years ago, when Törnqvist’s group began to use this network to divine the source of Louisiana’s subsidence, researchers realized the problem is not just sediment loss. Shallow soils, deposited in earlier centuries when the river ran free, are simply compressing. “Tide gauges were not capturing that,” says Molly Keogh, the Tulane graduate student who led the new work.The new paper lays out why. The region’s 131 tide gauges measure the tide in comparison with benchmarks anchored in deep sediments, often tens of meters down—”as close as we get to bedrock in Louisiana,” Keogh says. The region’s 10 GPS stations with known benchmarks were also anchored, on average, 14 meters deep in the mud. To both devices, the zone of the most compaction—a source of half the sea level rise—was invisible. The scenario could be true in other delta regions that also rely on tide gauges, casting doubt on estimates of regional sea level rise, says Mark Schuerch, a physical geographer at the University of Lincoln in the United Kingdom. “It’s quite innovative and quite exciting—or scary, really.”Figuring out the anchor depths of tide gauges elsewhere in the world will be a herculean task, warns Philip Woodworth, former director of the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level in Liverpool, U.K., who reviewed the paper. Tide gauge records do not typically include the depth of their benchmarks; that knowledge, if it exists, is buried in country bureaucracies.Moreover, the rate of shallow compaction probably varies greatly from wetland to wetland. In some marshes, plants compensate for compaction by capturing new sediment with their roots. And in some regions, such as Bangladesh, compaction occurs more uniformly across shallow and deep layers, says Céline Grall, a marine geologist at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, New York. “These assumptions are not true there.”Deploying elevation tables in deltas around the world could resolve those uncertainties, creating a global database, Törnqvist says. The tool is simple, cheap, and effective, and has already been used in more than 30 countries. For an area the size of coastal Louisiana, only 40 would be needed to keep track of subsidence—and determine how fast seas are truly rising. The millions of people living in the world’s deltas need to know the answer, Grall says. “That’s a legacy we should work on.” By Paul VoosenJan. 30, 2019 , 12:10 PM At many river deltas, scientists are missing a major source of sea level rise SIGIT DENI SASMITO/CIFOR/FLICKR center_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email For coastal communities, the sea level rise propelled by melting ice and warming oceans is bad enough. But people living on the soft, compressible sediments of river deltas have another factor to contend with: sinking land. Scientists have traditionally inferred the sinking from tide gauge readings or measured it directly at GPS stations. But a team of scientists now says these methods significantly underestimate subsidence at many deltas and low-lying coastlines worldwide.In recent years, scientists at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana, have shown that in the Mississippi River delta, fluffy, young sediments within a few meters of the surface are compacting rapidly. They estimate the effect more than doubles the region’s rate of sea-level rise to a total of 13 millimeters a year. Tide gauges and GPS stations miss that subsidence because they are anchored to deeper layers, which are less susceptible to compaction.The same mechanism is likely at play in many low-lying coastal areas worldwide, which host some 10% of the global population, the team argues in a paper published this week in Ocean Science. “Tide gauges are not measuring what we need,” says Torbjörn Törnqvist, a geologist at Tulane and co-author on the study. “We need to really rethink how we monitor these areas.”last_img read more

Duke University to settle case alleging researchers used fraudulent data to win

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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Ivan Oransky, Retraction WatchNov. 19, 2018 , 12:10 PM Duke University to settle case alleging researchers used fraudulent data to win millions in grants Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, is on the verge of settling a case brought by a former employee who claims the university included faked data in applications and reports for federal grants worth nearly $200 million.According to court documents filed last week in the Middle District of North Carolina in Greensboro, former Duke biologist Joseph Thomas, who sued the university in 2015 under a federal law that allows whistleblowers to receive as much as 30% of any payout, is waiting for the U.S. Department of Justice to approve the settlement. Thomas brought his case under the federal False Claims Act (FCA), which could force Duke to return to the government up to three times the amount of any ill-gotten funds.The terms of the settlement are not yet known, but are expected to be disclosed at a hearing scheduled for 7 December. Universities have been watching the case with interest. FCA claims against universities have been relatively rare, and a hefty settlement could prompt other academic whistleblowers to file similar cases, although private universities might be more vulnerable than public institutions. Regardless of the final settlement, the Duke case sends “the strong message to private institutions … go back and look at your grants because otherwise, you’re susceptible to a very large and ugly lawsuit that’s going to damage your programs,” says attorney Joel Androphy of Berg & Androphy in Houston, Texas, who specializes in FCA cases.In his suit, Thomas alleged that Duke biologist Erin Potts-Kant—who has now had 17 papers retracted, including many that reported on work done with her supervisor, pulmonology research William Michael Foster—included fraudulent data in 60 grant applications and reports. Potts-Kant had earlier pleaded guilty to embezzling more than $25,000 from Duke; that case prompted university officials to scrutinize her lab.Duke declined to comment on the proposed settlement. Attorneys for the plaintiff, who include John Thomas, formerly of Gentry Locke LLP in Roanoke, Virginia, and now of Healy Hafemann Magee, tells Science and Retraction Watch, “We are pleased that the parties have reached a settlement,” but declined further comment. (Joseph Thomas is John Thomas’s brother.)Androphy says such cases typically settle for 1.5 to two times the amount that plaintiffs prove was fraudulently obtained. Last year, Partners HealthCare and the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston settled an FCA case involving faked data for $10 million.Androphy said the length of this case—3.5 years—is shorter than what he usually sees. And he said he would not be surprised if, in its final settlement, the government requires Duke to agree to an enhanced compliance program for grants. A hint of such a program surfaced in March, when the National Institutes of Health (NIH) told Duke—in an unusual move—that its grant recipients would have to obtain prior approval for any changes to new or existing grants. The new oversight, according to a letter from NIH to Duke, is “a result of its concerns about Duke’s management of several research misconduct cases and grant management issues that date back to 2010, some of which have been widely reported like the Anil Potti case.”Last year, the Thomas case survived Duke’s motion to dismiss. In the course of the case, Potts-Kant admitted to faking data, and Duke acknowledged that it knew she had. Available court records, however, suggest Duke maintained that it did not discover the faked data until after the university submitted the grants in question.In September, Duke suffered a setback in the case after a judge’s ruling led to the release of numerous entries from a diary kept by Joseph Thomas that describe conversations among lab members. Joseph Thomas alleged they show that various researchers had knowledge of wrongdoing.This story was produced under a collaboration between Science and Retraction Watch.last_img read more

125 million gift from Microsoft cofounder launches new institute to probe immune

first_img Evan Agostini/AP Photo Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Immunology is the latest field that will benefit from a hefty sum donated by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. The newly launched Allen Institute for Immunology, planned before the philanthropist died in October from complications of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, will attempt to better define what’s normal for the immune system and why it falters in cancer and autoimmune diseases.The institute, which will be announced today at a press conference, will eventually hire about 70 researchers, who will work at the Seattle, Washington, location shared by Allen institutes focused on cell biology and the brain. Their new sibling starts with a nest egg of $125 million from Allen, but it could receive more money from his estate. The immunology institute will differ from the other Allen institutes because “we are going to be really dedicated to understanding disease mechanisms and translational opportunities,” says Executive Director Thomas Bumol, a former senior vice-president at Lilly Research Laboratories.With the recent explosion in immune-based therapies such as checkpoint inhibitors for treating cancer, it might seem that scientists have the immune system figured out. But these drugs aren’t the norm, Bumol says. “The successes are great but, as everyone knows, failure is the predominant result in drug discovery.” A prime reason for these stumbles, he says, is “a lack of understanding of the complexity of the immune system.” Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Paul Allencenter_img $125 million gift from Microsoft co-founder launches new institute to probe immune system By Mitch LeslieDec. 12, 2018 , 10:50 AM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) To refine that understanding, “we want to do a very detailed view of the immune system over time,” Bumol says. Researchers with the institute will track the immune function of three groups of people over periods of 5 years. The first group is 4-year-olds, who are starting to receive vaccinations and whose immune system is about to be assailed by all the pathogens they will pick up in school. The other two groups will be healthy adults in their 20s and 30s and older people between 55 and 65. Scientists at the institute will use recently developed techniques such as mass cytometry, which provides a much more detailed profile of cells’ identity and activities than older methods, to try to determine a baseline for the immune system.With these groups for comparison, scientists will then try to ferret out immune differences in people with either of two cancers—multiple myeloma or melanoma—or with the autoimmune illnesses rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, and Crohn disease. In the case of rheumatoid arthritis, Bumol says, researchers will study people who are at risk of developing the disease, in hopes of discovering what sets it off. Institute immunologists will have access to clinical data through partnerships with several medical centers.By including leaders from industry who understand drug development and forming partnerships with clinical researchers, the new institute improves its odds of making discoveries that spawn new treatments, says infection biologist Eric Skaar, who heads the Vanderbilt Institute for Infection, Immunology, and Inflammation in Nashville. And that $125 million won’t hurt. “It’s a large commitment [that] is proportional to the magnitude of the problem,” he says. Cellular immunologist Holden Maecker of Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, agrees that the project “is set up well for success.”The new institute’s approach isn’t revolutionary—other collaborations or researchers are using big data to delve into the human immune system, says immunologist Mitchell Kronenberg, president and chief scientific officer of the La Jolla Institute for Immunology in San Diego, California. “I expect them to make a contribution,” he says, “but I think it will be additive.”last_img read more

James Dean Got a Speeding Ticket 2 Hours Before his Fatal Crash

first_imgThe life and death of James Dean sent shockwaves through Hollywood that are still felt today. When he lived he was admired for his striking looks and naturalistic acting. When he died in 1955 at the age of 24 he became an icon, cut down in his prime with still so much to give. Part of Dean’s power comes from the fact that two of his major big-screen roles, in Rebel Without A Cause and Giant, were shown after his death. The intensity of those characters was matched by the sudden and violent manner of the car crash that killed him.Dean and his Porsche Super Speedster 23F at Palm Springs Races March 1955.The incident occurred on September 30th. Dean and Rudolf Wütherich, a German racer and engineer, were burning rubber on the way to Salinas, California. They had reason to be in a hurry — Dean was developing another career as a racing driver, and a big race was taking place there.Dean and Wütherich were in a Porsche 550 Spyder convertible, nicknamed “The Little Bastard” by the young star. The name was possibly appropriate, sharing the actor’s reputation for rubbing the establishment up the wrong way. A Mail Online article reporting on a 2014 James Dean season at BFI Southbank featured a recollection by the actor Dennis Hopper.Dean in East of Eden (1955)When filming East Of Eden, Hopper claimed that “before shooting Elia Kazan told the cast and crew that they were about to meet a young actor who might be strange and difficult, but would be ‘pure gold on screen.’ In walked Dean, issuing a volley of four-letter expletives. Raymond Massey, who was playing Dean’s father in the film, turned to Kazan and said, ‘What price is gold?’”The lead up to the accident was similarly fraught, with an eerie foreshadowing of what was to come when the Porsche was stopped by a traffic cop. Approximately two hours before his death at 3.30 p.m. Dean was handed a speeding ticket in Bakersfield.Publicity still of James Dean for the film Rebel Without a Cause.The ticket is unremarkable, save for the artful handwriting. It would escape many people’s attention were it not for what’s written next to ‘Driver’s Full Name’… one James Byron Dean.A small article about the crash in the Springfield Union paper dated October 2, 1955 states that he was charged with “driving 65 miles an hour in a 45-mile zone of the winding grapevine grade ridge route road south of Bakersfield”.Dean should have known better if only because of the public service announcement about road safety he’d shot alongside fellow actor Gig Young. According to Wütherich, the irony wasn’t lost on his friend.Great Hollywood legends quotes150 miles later a Ford Tudor driven by Donald Turnupseed, a student who was a year younger than Dean, made a left turn at an intersection on Route 466. Some believe the movie star’s Porsche came hurtling towards him at such a speed there was no stopping it.The location of Dean’s death, renamed “James Dean Memorial Junction.” Photo by Pflatau CC BY 2.5The Springfield Union goes on to say that “Checking time of the citation with that of the fatal accident many miles to the north, officers reckoned the 24-year-old actor must have driven his… sports car all the way at an average speed of nearly 75 miles per hour.”Witnesses at the scene thought Dean’s speed was reasonable and that Turnupseed was maybe at fault. Either way, Dean couldn’t brake in time and smashed into the side of the car. Miraculously the student escaped, relatively unscathed. As for the others, they didn’t fare well.James Dean’s grave, Park Cemetery, Fairmount, IN.Wütherich was thrown from the car, double-fracturing his jaw, damaging his femur and tearing his hip. Dean’s extensive injuries, including a broken neck, meant he never stood a chance. His immortality in Hollywood had been achieved in the worst possible way.Read another story: Gimme Shelter: The Hell’s Angels Plot to Assassinate Mick JaggerMovie fans often wonder how his career would have progressed if he’d survived, or never stepped into the Porsche in the first place. Even so, James Dean’s image and performance are celebrated around the world, meaning something good came out of this terrible tragedy.Steve Palace is a writer, journalist and comedian from the UK. Sites he contributes to include The Vintage News, Art Knews Magazine and The Hollywood News. His short fiction has been published as part of the Iris Wildthyme range from Obverse Books.last_img read more

Trump administration says it will negotiate with Iran with no preconditions

first_img mike pompeo, donald trump, US Iran relations, Trump on relations with Iran U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo attends a press conference with Swiss foreign minister Ignazio Cassis at the CastelGrande as part of Pompeo’s visit in Bellinzona, Switzerland, on Sunday. (AP)Written by Edward Wong Hua Qu, the wife of Wang Xiyue, a Princeton graduate student imprisoned by Iran since 2016 on a charge of espionage, wrote on May 24 in The Washington Post that she was imploring world powers to get Tehran to free her husband. India-US ties: Pompeo says great friends disagree, Jaishankar firm on S-400 deal Even in opening the door to talks, Pompeo said the United States would continue to try to counter Iran’s support of groups in the Middle East that undermine U.S. interests.“We’re prepared to engage in a conversation with no preconditions,” Pompeo said at a news conference in Switzerland, which acts as a conduit between Washington and Tehran. “We’re ready to sit down with them. But the American effort to fundamentally reverse the malign activity of the Islamic Republic, this revolutionary force, is going to continue.”Trump appears to be trying to walk a tightrope on Iran policy. He has told aides he wants to avoid a war, yet his top foreign policy officials are pressing him to amplify a “maximum pressure” campaign against Iran that relies on sanctions and shows of military force.The talk of negotiations by Trump and now Pompeo play to Trump’s dealmaker image. It suggests that even as he ratchets up military and financial pressure against Iran that he is also seeking a new deal to keep Iran from building a nuclear weapon. Let’s speak out in favour of religious freedom: Pompeo on his India visit In a second major softening of U.S. policy toward Iran in recent days, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Sunday that the Trump administration was ready to negotiate with the country’s clerical leaders with “no preconditions.”The statement followed President Donald Trump’s comment last week that he was ready to talk to Iranian leaders and was not seeking regime change, overruling a longtime goal of his national security adviser. Pompeo’s statement also recalibrated his earlier position that the United States would not lift sanctions on Iran unless it complied with a dozen sweeping demands, suggesting that those demands could be part of negotiations instead of preconditions.Iran’s leaders consider the demands unacceptable.Tensions between the United States and Iran have escalated sharply in recent weeks, raising fears that the two countries were edging toward war. The less combative language does not change the fact that the Trump administration has tightened economic sanctions on Iran, ordered 1,500 additional troops to the Persian Gulf and revised military plans against Iran. Advertising “I think the administration is trying to de-escalate tensions to accommodate the president’s recent statements that he’d like to negotiate with Iran,” said Dalia Dassa Kaye, a Middle East analyst at the RAND Corp., a research group. “But the problem is Secretary Pompeo’s statement is still talking about negotiations only when Iran starts acting like a ‘normal’ country. That type of language is not likely to entice the Iranians to the table, especially as maximum pressure policies continue on the ground.”Pompeo’s comments Sunday were responding to an opening by President Hassan Rouhani of Iran on Saturday. Rouhani said Iran was willing to talk with the United States if it “sits respectfully at the negotiating table” rather than ordering Iran to hold discussions.“We have shown that we do not submit to bullying,” Rouhani said, according to Iran’s Fars News Agency.An Iranian Foreign Ministry spokesman said Sunday that Pompeo’s statement was “word play” and that what mattered to Tehran was a change in the U.S. government’s “general approach and actual behavior toward the Iranian nation,” Iran’s Mehr News Agency reported. Advertising Best Of Express Post Comment(s) By New York Times |Switzerland | Published: June 3, 2019 8:06:43 am Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 Trump abandoned a nuclear deal with Iran a year ago, fulfilling a campaign promise, and reimposed major economic sanctions in November. More recently, his administration has designated an arm of the Iranian military as a terrorist organization, ended permission for eight countries to buy oil from Iran despite economic sanctions, accused Iran of plotting to attack American targets in the Middle East and sent a battle group to the region.Nuclear experts said Iran had been complying with the nuclear agreement, which it had negotiated with six world powers in 2015 in exchange for the lifting of harsh economic sanctions. The agreement limited Iran’s ability to produce nuclear fuel for 15 years.European nations still abide by the agreement and have urged Iran to stick with it.Last month, Rouhani said Iran would stop abiding by parts of the agreement, and would resume the production of nuclear centrifuges and begin accumulating nuclear material. He said Iran was not following “the path of war,” but choosing “the path of diplomacy.”Pompeo met Sunday with Ignazio Cassis, the Swiss foreign minister, to discuss Iran and other matters in a centuries-old castle in Bellinzona, a medieval Italian-speaking town of pastel-painted homes nestled among steep, green valleys.Switzerland has acted as an interlocutor between the United States and Iran since Washington broke off diplomatic relations with Tehran in 1980, and it hosted negotiations over the 2015 nuclear deal forged by the Obama administration.Cassis stressed the urgent need to bring down tensions between the United States and Iran. He said Switzerland was willing to broker any diplomacy, but only if both governments commit to talks.Cassis added that Iranians are suffering from the sanctions imposed by the Trump administration, and Switzerland is ready to provide humanitarian medical aid and food. But the Trump administration must allow banks to transfer payments from Iran.His plea rebutted earlier remarks from Pompeo, who has insisted that the sanctions do not bar humanitarian aid from Iran.As representatives of American interests in Iran, Swiss diplomats have also tried to make visits to U.S. prisoners in the country. Iran is holding at least six U.S. citizens and one permanent resident.Pompeo declined on Sunday to speak in detail about any talks conducted through Switzerland or other third parties to free the prisoners, but did not deny that such negotiations could be taking place.“The United States is working with all willing nations to assist us in getting them returned,” he said.In July, Trump said he was willing to talk to Iran with “no preconditions,” but that was well before tensions soared. On May 5, John R. Bolton, the hawkish national security adviser, said the White House had ordered the accelerated movement of an aircraft carrier strike group and bombers to the Persian Gulf from the Mediterranean Sea.U.S. officials told reporters afterward that they had gotten intelligence that showed the Iranian military or allied Arab militias might attack U.S. interests. Pompeo ordered almost all U.S. diplomats to leave Iraq, which borders Iran.But European officials and some U.S. legislators who had seen the same intelligence said the threat level did not look much higher than usual and did not warrant the measures and tone of urgency adopted by the Trump administration.They criticized Trump’s announcement on May 24 that he was ordering 1,500 more troops to the region and declaring an emergency over Iran to push through arms sales to Tehran’s main regional rivals, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Those sales had been blocked by Congress because the weapons are used to kill civilians in the disastrous Yemen civil war.Against the backdrop of tensions with Iran, there has been a conspicuous flurry of diplomacy between top U.S. and Swiss officials. On May 16, Trump hosted Ueli Maurer, the Swiss president, at the White House — a first by an American president.On Wednesday, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s top leader, said his nation would not negotiate directly with the United States. But he said talks could be conducted through a third party. Rouhani’s comments Saturday left open the possibility of direct talks.Pompeo and Bolton have prioritized confronting Iran over what the State Department calls Tehran’s “expansionist foreign policy.” Last year, Pompeo made 12 demands of Iran that included a call for Iranian leaders to drop support for political groups and militias in nearby Arab countries and for the release of all U.S. prisoners. More Explained Related News Chandrayaan-2 gets new launch date days after being called off P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies Advertising Taking stock of monsoon rain India, US should embrace age of ambition, says Mike Pompeo last_img read more

Trump border deal Central American migrants say deal doesnt dash asylum hopes

first_imgBack at the Juventud 2000 shelter, Luis Torres and other parents killed time watching over the dozens of kids playing in the cramped space between tightly packed tents. The shelter, just one of many in Tijuana, is housing about 150 people, all families. Kids jumped rope and chased each other between tents.Torres, 40, said that he and his 12-year-old son entered Texas from Reynosa, Mexico, last month. US authorities then flew them to San Diego where they were detained for two weeks, he said.Torres was confused about the status of his case, because he wasn’t sure whether he had requested asylum by signing documents that agents put in front of him without explaining. In any case he was given a date to return to the US in September.Torres, a carpenter, left because his neighborhood in Honduras’ capital, Tegucigalpa, is dangerous and work is hard to come by. He sent his other four children to live with their grandmother outside the city. Torres said that he and his son did not encounter problems in Mexico during the 26 days they took to reach the US border.Torres had heard talk of the US-Mexico agreement, which includes Mexico sending thousands of National Guard troops to target illegal immigration at its southern border. He said it would be better if each country stuck to its own policies rather than the US pressuring Mexico to do more. Mother, wife of drowned Salvadoran migrants awaits their repatriation Seven migrant deaths reported in ‘extreme heat’ at US border LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? Parents of girl from India who died in US desert ‘desperate’ for asylum “We didn’t come so that they can play politics with us,” he said. Best Of Express Advertising Advertising Mexico has offered opportunities for Central American migrants like Sabillon to legalise their status so they can work while waiting or if they decide to stay in Mexico. But he is not interested.Most Mexicans are good people, he said, but some curse migrants in the street. On Saturday, he took his family to hear Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador speak at a rally in downtown Tijuana. He wasn’t able to hear the president’s words about respecting migrants’ human rights because the crowd around him got worked up after a woman shouted, “Mexicans first and those from the caravan can go to …,” he said, not repeating the profanity.“That hurts us a lot,” he said.trump border deal, trump mexico deal, trump mexico, mexico migrants, central america migrants, us border, us migrants, us mexico border A migrant cooks food at a shelter used mostly by Mexican and Central American migrants who are applying for asylum in the US, at the border in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, June 9, 2019. (Source: AP)Sabillon is at least in the fortunate position of having his US court date just a couple weeks away.Nearby, at one of the city’s principal crossings to the US, dozens of migrants — mostly Haitians — waited in line for a number that would determine when they could cross to the US to request asylum. On Sunday, US border officers announced only two numbers and people who got their numbers in the past week were some 700 places away from the numbers being called, suggesting a wait of many months ahead. P Rajagopal, Saravana Bhavan founder sentenced to life for murder, dies That all changed in April when one of the street gangs plaguing Honduras and other Central American countries gave him a deadline of five days to begin paying a monthly extortion fee of about $120, Sabillon said. He said the gangsters thought he could pay because his daughter went to a good school, but she was on scholarship. The family earned enough only to keep food on the table and pay the utilities, he said.Two days before the deadline, Sabillon slipped away in the middle of the night with his wife and 8-year-old daughter and left Honduras. It took them about two weeks to reach Tijuana, across the border from San Diego. They quickly crossed into the US illegally near Tijuana’s beach and asked for asylum. After five days in detention they were sent back to Tijuana at night with an appointment to return later this month.trump border deal, trump mexico deal, trump mexico, mexico migrants, central america migrants, us border, us migrants, us mexico border Tents fill a shelter used mostly by Mexican and Central American migrants who are applying for asylum in the U.S., on the border in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, June 9, 2019. (Source: AP)The mechanism that allows the US to send migrants seeking asylum back to Mexico to await resolution of their cases has been running in Tijuana since January. One part of Friday’s agreement between Mexico and the US to head off the threat of US tariffs on all imports from Mexico was an expansion of that program along the entire border.As of last week, about 10,000 asylum seekers had been returned to Mexico, according to Mexican officials. So far the program has been operating only in California and in El Paso, Texas. It is currently being challenged in US courts. Advertising Post Comment(s) But Edwin Sabillon Orellana of Honduras said he and his family will stick with their effort to seek asylum in the USSabillon said some migrants might decide that waiting in Mexico for the lengthy processing of asylum requests isn’t worth it, but he said he cannot take his family back to their home near San Pedro Sula, a crime-ridden metropolis that is Honduras’ second biggest city.“In my dreams I never had it in my mind to one day come to the United States,” the 30-year-old assembly plant worker said, sitting near a large pot of half-made salsa ranchera awaiting a delivery of cooking gas to the shelter’s kitchen. “I had my job, my wife had her job. My daughter was in a bilingual school — my daughter speaks English. I didn’t have a reason to come here.” Taking stock of monsoon rain More Explained By AP |Mexico, Tijuana | Published: June 10, 2019 8:58:54 am Related News Ayodhya dispute: Mediation to continue till July 31, SC hearing likely from August 2 trump border deal, trump mexico deal, trump mexico, mexico migrants, central america migrants, us border, us migrants, us mexico border A migrant plays with his little girl as they wait to be attended to apply for asylum in the United States, at the border in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, June 9, 2019. (Source: AP)At the small migrant Juventud 2000 shelter near the border, a Honduran expressed disappointment Sunday over the agreement between Mexico and the United States to more aggressively to curtail migration from Central America.last_img read more

Biologists create the most lifelike artificial cells yet

first_img No biologist would mistake the microscopic “cells” that chemical biologist Neal Devaraj and colleagues are whipping up at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), for the real thing. Instead of the lipid membrane that swaddles our cells, these cell mimics wear a coat of plastic—polymerized acrylate. And although they harbor a nucleuslike compartment containing DNA, it lacks a membrane like a real cell’s nucleus, and its main ingredients are minerals found in clay.Yet these mock cells are cutting-edge, “the closest anyone has come to building an actual functioning synthetic eukaryotic cell,” says synthetic biologist Kate Adamala of the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, who was not part of the work. Like real cells, the spheres can send protein signals to their neighbors, triggering communal behavior. And as Devaraj and his team revealed in a preprint recently posted on the bioRxiv site, the “nucleus” talks to the rest of the cell, releasing RNA that sparks the synthesis of proteins. The artificial nuclei can even respond to signals from other cell mimics. “This may be the most important paper in synthetic biology this year,” Adamala says.Synthetic biologists have big dreams for artificial cells. Compared with simpler synthetic structures, such as the liposomes that are already being used to transport certain drugs in the body, they could be more sensitive to their environment and perform a greater variety of jobs. In the future, artificial cells may deliver drugs more precisely to their targets, hunt down cancer cells, detect toxic chemicals, or improve the accuracy of diagnostic testing. Arrays of interacting synthetic cells could form artificial tissues and smart materials that sense and adapt to their surroundings. As scientists struggle to devise cell facsimiles, they may also learn more about how life originated and overcame some of the same engineering challenges. In a mix of artificial cells, one kind (purple) makes and releases a fluorescent protein, which is received and trapped within a second kind (gray), turning those mimics green. Performing some functions of a cell, such as manufacturing proteins and duplicating DNA, in isolation won’t be enough. “If we are going to develop synthetic materials, we need to have the individual units cooperate,” Devaraj says. Researchers had already devised synthetic cells that can communicate with each other by exchanging relatively small molecules such as sugars and hydrogen peroxide. However, Devaraj notes, many of the molecular signals in our bodies, including the hormone insulin and the cytokines that fire up our immune cells, are proteins and are typically much larger.To make a more cell-like cell mimic, Devaraj and his colleagues stepped away from nature. Their latest pseudocells “look a little bit like natural cells, but they are made of completely artificial materials,” says co-author Henrike Niederholtmeyer, a synthetic biologist at UCSD. The researchers used a silicon chip with microscopic fluid-filled channels to extrude tiny droplets that contain raw materials such as DNA, minerals from clay, and individual acrylate molecules. Ultraviolet light and chemical treatment spurred a porous membrane to form around each droplet. At the same time, the minerals and DNA inside the droplet condensed into a gel with the texture of a soft contact lens, creating a version of the nucleus, Devaraj says.The result was a cell replica with new powers of communication. For some experiments, Devaraj’s team equipped the nuclei of the cell mimics with DNA that encodes green fluorescent protein (GFP). They also outfitted some of their creations with a trap, a sticky stretch of DNA that captures GFP molecules. By adding a mixture of enzymes and other necessities for protein synthesis, such as ribosomes, to the fluid surrounding the ersatz cells, the investigators switched them on. This molecular machinery crossed the porous membrane, read the genetic information in the nucleus, and sparked synthesis of GFP.The scientists then mixed cell mimics designed to produce GFP with receiver cells that couldn’t make the marker themselves but did harbor the DNA trap for GFP. After 2 hours, receiver cells that were adjacent to senders were aglow, indicating that they had picked up the GFP message from neighbors. In a similar experiment, the team crafted mimics that released a different protein signal that switches on GFP synthesis in recipients. Like real cells, these cell mimics could communicate with nearby counterparts and stimulate them to produce proteins.The imitation cells also displayed another lifelike attribute called quorum sensing, in which cells’ behavior changes once they become abundant enough. This ability came to light when researchers tested solutions containing different densities of cell mimics, all of which released the activator of GFP synthesis and could make GFP as well when triggered. If a solution contained only a few of the synthetic cells, almost none turned green. After they reached a threshold density, however, nearly all of them lit up. Before they can begin to make GFP, the artificial cells apparently need to absorb a certain minimal amount of the activating protein from their surroundings.The cell mimics are tough, remaining undamaged after 2 years in a freezer. Their durability may make them good environmental sensors—one of several applications for the structures that the UCSD team is now exploring. And Devaraj and colleagues hope to equip these or other synthetic cells with the ability to grow and divide.Bioengineer Yuval Elani of Imperial College London is impressed with the design of the cell mimics. “The concept of using these nonbiological components is a powerful one.” But the artificial components could also be a drawback for applications, he notes, if they prove incompatible with “natural” components making up artificial cells that other researchers are developing. By Mitch LeslieNov. 19, 2018 , 1:00 PM Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe HENRIKE NIEDERHOLTMEYER Biologists create the most lifelike artificial cells yetlast_img read more

Struggling to make ends meet Indias earlycareer scientists take to the streets

first_imgScientists protested at the Indian Institute of Science in Bengaluru on 21 December 2018. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Sanjay KumarJan. 2, 2019 , 12:40 PM Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Atul Pradhan Struggling to make ends meet, India’s early-career scientists take to the streetscenter_img Email The new year is likely to see more protests by young Indian researchers struggling to make ends meet—which could include hunger strikes. Their leaders will meet on Thursday in New Delhi to chart a new course of action for their movement, which has taken to the streets several times the past few months. During the last protest, on 21 December 2018, thousands of researchers demonstrated at research institutions and universities around the country and at the federal science ministry in New Delhi.The scientists say their fellowship stipends are far too low to get by and often arrive 6 or even 12 months late. Prakash Javdekar, India’s minister of human resource development, acknowledged on 26 December 2018 that there had been backlogs, but said those have been addressed and cleared. The researchers called his statement a bluff; moreover, if the government wants to retain young talent, they say, it needs to increase the fellowships by 80% and provide for annual increases to make up for the rising cost of living.Many Indian agencies, including the University Grants Commission, the Council of Scientific & Industrial Research, and the Department of Science & Technology, provide stipends to early-career scientists who have passed an eligibility test. Ph.D. students receive just 25,000 rupees ($356) monthly the first 2 years and 28,000 rupees the following 3 years; research associates make 36,000 rupees to 40,000 rupees per month. Those not provided with a hostel room also get a modest rent allowance. The amounts haven’t gone up in 4 years, even though housing costs have risen sharply. “In cities like Delhi or Bengaluru, rents automatically shoot up by 10% to 15% every [10] months, and many researchers coming from other cities don’t get hostels,” says Lal Chandra Vishwakarma, chairperson of the Society of Young Scientists at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences in New Delhi. The long delays in payment amount to “enormous psychological harassment,” says Vishwakarma, who has led the recent protests.One young researcher at Delhi University who asked not to be named says she knows a fellow researcher who sometimes skips meals for days while his fellowship money is delayed. “Instead of focusing on research, students are forced to waste precious time chasing their fellowship money,” the researcher says. Researchers say they face enormous societal pressure to do better financially as others of their age and education level take up well-paying jobs outside academe.The situation is even worse for the large number of researchers enrolled in Ph.D. programs who have not passed the tests for a fellowship; they get almost no financial support. A nanotechnology researcher at the Rajiv Gandhi Technical University in Bhopal, India, says he receives no payments at all from his institute or the state government and even pays for his experiments from his own pocket.The Indian government’s principal scientific adviser, Krishnaswamy VijayRaghavan, acknowledges the problems. “While the situation is much better than a few years ago, there is much to be done and we recognize that and are addressing the matter,” he told ScienceInsider. “As we increase the footprint of science, our personnel costs go up,” VijayRaghavan says. “But overall we are working hard to increase support for students at all levels.”Ashutosh Sharma, secretary of India’s Department of Science & Technology and a nanotechnologist at the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, is sympathetic to the demands as well. “I personally support the idea of regular increases instead of every 4 years,” he says. Sharma says he’s hopeful the next raise will come soon but alludes to the complexities of bringing together all of the government agencies involved—including the finance ministry, which controls the purse strings.Indian researchers hope general elections to be held in April or May will help their cause. Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s popularity has dropped recently—his Bharatiya Janata Party lost all five state elections held in December 2018—and alienating younger voters and the scientific community could hurt Modi’s chances to stay in power, researchers say. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

JK Suspected Pakistani intruder shot dead by BSF personnel

first_img Amid tight security, 14th batch of 5,210 pilgrims leave Jammu for Amarnath Related News Post Comment(s) By Express News Service |Jammu | Published: July 15, 2019 1:25:24 pm In India, 66 per cent households own TV sets Significant drop in stone pelting incidents in J-K: Officials bsf, bsf recruitment, bsf recruitment 2019, bsf head constable recruitment, bsf head constable recruitment 2019, www.bsf.nic.in, bsf recruitment notification, bsf recruitment 2019 notification, bsf constable vacancy, bsf last date to apply, bsf recruitment apply online, sarkari result, bsf jobs, govt jobs, job news, indian express news A suspected Pakistani intruder was killed along the international border. (Representational)A suspected Pakistani intruder was killed along the international border by Border Security Force (BSF) personnel in Jammu and Kashmir’s Samba district during the wee hours of Monday.According to police, the deceased, 60, was trying to cross the international border and sneaked into the Indian side in Ramgarh sector around 3 am. Further details are awaited as the body was kept at S M Pura border post.last_img read more

Highly Sensitive Encrypted Email at Risk of Exposure

first_imgAlthough the issue is serious, it has more to do with buggy clients at the host than with OpenPGP, Exabeam Chief Security Strategist Stephen Moore he told TechNewsWorld.Some email clients fail to use the encryption protocol’s native features to stymie the kind of attack described by the researchers, noted Phil Zimmermann, author of PGP and an associate professor at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands.”There’s some checking that goes on in PGP. If the email client reacts to the news delivered by PGP that something has been tampered with, then everything will be OK,” he told TechNewsWorld. “But if the client ignores that information, then you get this vulnerability.”Fixing the flaw in an email client that uses PGP isn’t an onerous task, Zimmermann added.”I saw someone patch it pretty quickly, within a few hours,” he said.A patch to address the flaw already has been made for the Thunderbird email client, but not yet for Apple Mail, said Nate Cardozo, a senior staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation.”The patch doesn’t close the vulnerability — it just makes it impossible to exploit on a client,” he told TechNewsWorld.”Emails that are sent from the client are still exploitable,” Cardozo pointed out. “It fixes the receiving end of the vul, but it doesn’t fix the underlying vulnerability in the protocol, which remains.”When that underlying problem is fixed, it likely won’t be backward-compatible, he added. Client Ignores Bad News Past Messages Endangered Adding to the severity of the attack is its ability to access past emails.”The victim’s mail client can be used as a tool to decrypt old emails that have been sent or received,” Cardozo said. “That’s pretty severe.”For users concerned about the security of their PGP or S/MIME email clients, Eset’s Dorais-Joncas offered these recommendations:Stop using vulnerable email clients to decrypt emails. Use a standalone application.Disable HTML rendering and automatic remote content in your email client. This will block the backchannel communication mechanism used by the flaw to exfiltrate cleartext data.Look for updates. It is expected that vendors will issue patches to correct some of the flaws exposed by the researchers. John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John.center_img Sensitive Info Threatened A newfound flaw in email clients that use PGP and S/MIME to encrypt messages can be exploited to expose the plain text of the missives, according to a paper published Monday.By injecting malicious snippets of text into encrypted messages, attackers can use the flaw to make the email client exfiltrate decrypted copies of the emails, explained the authors, a team of researchers from three European universities.Malicious action is triggered as soon as a recipient opens a single crafted email from an attacker, they wrote. The team is comprised of researchers from the Munster University of Applied Sciences and Ruhr University Bochum, both in Germany, and KU Leuven in the Netherlands.The software defect was found in 23 of 35 S/MIME clients and in 10 of 28 PGP clients tested.”While it is necessary to change the OpenPGP and S/MIME standards to fix these vulnerabilities, some clients had even more severe implementation flaws allowing straightforward exfiltration of the plaintext,” the researchers wrote. Since only a small percentage of email users employ a PGP or S/MIME client, the threat the flaw poses to all users isn’t as severe as it could be, said Alexis Dorais-Joncas, security intelligence team lead at Eset.”However, it is extremely severe for the vulnerable users and their correspondents, as this threat offers a way for an attacker to access clear-text content of communications meant to be secure,” he told TechNewsWorld.Of the more than 3 billion email users in the world, only tens of millions use PGP mail, EFF’s Cardozo estimated.”Those that use it, however, are people like journalists, system administrators and folks that run vulnerability reporting programs at big companies,” he said, “so the type of information that is sent via PGP is usually the most sensitive of sensitive.” last_img read more

Facebook Adds Hardware Software Vetting and 4K to 360 Live

first_imgFacebook on Tuesday announced several updates to its live-streaming platform, including a new hardware and software vetting program used to create 360-degree video.Through its new Live 360 Ready Program, Facebook will review hardware and software and approve products that work well with its Live 360 offering. Products deemed “ready” for Live 360 will be allowed to display a Facebook Live logo on their packaging or website.”Each camera’s app or Web experience will enable you to interact with your friends and followers through direct access to Facebook’s native reactions and comments,” noted Facebook Product Manager Chetan Gupta and Product Marketing Manager Caitlin Ramrakha in an online post.Facebook has approved 11 cameras and seven software suites so far.Live 360 Ready cameras included Giroptic iO, Insta360 Nano, Insta360 Air, Insta360 Pro, ION360 U, Nokia Ozo, Z CAM S1, 360Fly HD, 360Fly 4K and 360Fly 4K Pro.Live 360 Ready software packages included Assimilate SCRATCH VR, Groovy Gecko, LiveScale, Teradek, Voysys, Wowza and Z CAM WonderLive.”The way we communicate is getting more and more visual, and live 360 video is the richest medium of all,” said JK Liu, CEO of Insta360, maker of a Live 360 Ready camera.”We’re excited to bring Facebook users a way to go live in 360 that fits in seamlessly with the way they already use their phones,” he told TechNewsWorld. Post-Production Tools The latest updates to Live 360 are a content play, said Ross Rubin, principal analyst at Reticle Research.”It’s about encouraging content and ensuring a level of compatibility and quality control over that content,” he told TechNewsWorld.The updates also are a way to help Facebook compete with YouTube.”Being a video platform rival to YouTube has been a longstanding goal of Facebook,” Rubin said.The upgrades are aimed more at professional video and advanced content creators than mainstream users, noted Jack Kent, a senior analyst with IHS Markit.However, they “should increase the amount of Live 360 content for Facebook users,” he told TechNewsWorld.Facebook has been expanding its 360 video and live video strategies rapidly in recent months, Kent pointed out.”It rolled out Live 360 to all pages earlier this year,” he said, “and integrated with a range of leading camera makers and added new audio tools. The new Live 360 Ready Program aims to extend support for a wider range of third-party software and devices.” Facebook also announced that Live 360 streams will support 4K resolution. What’s more, it will be available in virtual reality.”Live 360 broadcasts will be available to watch in VR — both while they’re happening and after they’re over — in our free Facebook 360 app for Gear VR, available on the Oculus Store,” Gupta and Ramrakha wrote.Resolution has been frustrating for some 360 video content providers on Facebook, said Chris Michaels, streaming industry evangelist at Wowza Media Systems, a Live 360 Ready software maker.”One of the biggest challenges for content creators has been delivering in a high enough resolution to provide breathtaking 360 degree experiences,” he told TechNewsWorld.”With 4K, we don’t have to worry about rendering down high-quality video and can deliver it at its optimal design rate.”Facebook also will be adding donate buttons and scheduling to Live 360.Donate buttons allow nonprofits to raise funds when they stream a Live 360 broadcast — either their own or someone else’s.Scheduling allows Live 360 broadcasters to alert their friends and followers of an upcoming broadcast. The alert is posted to their news feeds, where they can choose to receive a reminder alert when the broadcast is about to start. Facebook announced a number of new post-production tools for Live 360 as well.If it detects shakiness in a video, Facebook will use its stablization tool to steady it.With the guide tool, a video author can identify points of interest in a video and direct viewers to them.If you’re wondering what parts of your video most engage your audience, there’s a heatmap tool that shows you that.Finally, there’s a crossport tool for broadening the distribution of your video.center_img Content Play 4K Added John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John.last_img read more

Study examines attitudes toward lesbian gay and transgender individuals

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 24 2018A University of Oklahoma sociologist, Meredith G. F. Worthen, examines how measures of social contact and social distancing relate to attitudes toward lesbian, gay and transgender individuals in a new study. Worthen uses a scale she developed and data from college students in the United States (Oklahoma and Texas), Italy and Spain to offer the first cross-cultural comparisons of attitudes toward transgender people in the United States and European Union. The goal is to develop a more in-depth understanding of global LGT prejudices and to promote future research that better counteracts negative prejudices toward these groups.”The findings suggest that measures of desired social contact with LGT people are more strongly related to LGT support than simple measures of knowing LGT people. This is likely because more and more people know LGT people than in the past. But as demonstrated in this study, these patterns differ based on cultural climate and by stigmatized group (lesbian, gay or transgender),” said Worthen, professor in the Department of Sociology, OU College of Arts and Sciences.While there is a great deal of variation in attitudes toward LGT people across the globe, the United States and the European Union have been actively working toward more support of LGT people in the past decade. Even so, cultural tensions remain high, and in certain parts of the United States and the European Union, negative attitudes toward and public support of LGT issues persist.This study shows some locations are especially supportive, while others have yet to adopt widespread policies that support LGT people. Oklahoma is known for its conservative perspectives, while Texas has ‘liberal pockets’ that support LGT issues. In the European Union, Italy is dominated by traditional cultural attitudes, while Spain was among the first locations in the world to recognize same-sex marriage. In addition, most Americans and Europeans know someone who is gay or lesbian, but a smaller percentage know someone who is transgender.This study suggests that especially in liberal cultural climates, simply knowing a gay or lesbian person may no longer serve as a correlation of supportive attitudes toward LGT people. Instead, desired social contact may be a more salient measure of understanding attitudes toward gays and lesbians in both conservative and liberal cultural climates. In contrast, because a minority of Americans and Europeans indicate they know a transgender person, actual social contact may still correlate with attitudes toward and desired social contact with transgender people in both conservative and liberal cultural climates.Source: http://www.ou.edu/web/news_events/articles/news_2018/new-study-examines-attitudes-toward-lgt-individualslast_img read more